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quinta-feira, 10 de Julho de 2014

Super teacher?


Uma brilhante e sincera conversa entre profissionais, por Rosanna Elden (Hileah High School Teacher, EUA), num Seminário da EWA, em 2012. A EWA - Education Writers Association propõe-se pretende responder à questão: como transformamos a profissão de professor numa profissão de prestígio?
O grande professor do futuro sabe que ainda não é um grande professor.  O primeiro ano de profissão é decisivo. Cada novo professor aprende, antes de mais, com os seus alunos. Mas vai precisar de: 
  • Humor
  • Honestidade
  • Conselhos práticos

quinta-feira, 26 de Junho de 2014

Future-of-the-LIS-Profession (including schools libraries as special)

Relatórios sobre o futuro das profissões LIS, Australia, ALIA, 2014. Um deles, sobre as Bibliotecas Escoalres, reconhecidas como uma área especializada.



Da introdução

The Australian Bureau of Statistics’ Schools Australia 2012 report stated the number of Australian government schools (6,697), Catholic schools (1,713) and independent schools (1,017), giving a total of 9,427 primary and secondary schools.
Almost all schools have a library of some description, but they vary enormously in terms of staffing, facilities and resources. At the lower end, there are schools with a few shelves of books and a member of staff whose responsibility it is to look after them, as part of a much wider teaching or administration role. At the high end, there are flagship library and IT hubs, with more than a dozen members of staff. Several of the team will be qualified  teacher librarians. They will have a growing collection of print and ebooks and provide a 
range of services to students, including safer online experiences, group learning and study spaces, and more electronic resources.
ALIA School Libraries Advisory Committee and ALIA Schools Group (based in Victoria) liaise with the Australian School Library Association and the state-based school library associations to create a united voice for the sector.
Current services for users include:
  • Books, ebooks and other resources in print and digital forms, for study and reading for pleasure.
  • Fast, safe internet access on library computers, and wi-fi for students’ own devices.
  • Formal classes and informal learning opportunities for students.
  • Quiet study spaces and rooms for group work.
  • y Resources and curriculum support for teachers.


Do sumário:

There were six themes that emerged, specific to libraries in primary, secondary, K–12, government, Catholic and independent schools.
1. The most important job in the library and information sector 
School library staff encourage children to develop a lifelong love of books and reading for pleasure.
2. Deepening the divide
Independent and Catholic schools continue to invest more in libraries than their government counterparts.
3. Easy and rewarding
Affordable technologies will be needed to make the library experience as easy as, and more rewarding than Google.
4. Digital skills
Staff will need new skills to manage digital collections and guide students through the online maze.
5. Parent power
We will need to engage parents as advocates for school libraries.
6. Competing for attention
School libraries will need to market their services, in competition with some of the world’s biggest online brands
(Google, Facebook, YouTube).
Ler mais aqui:

https://www.alia.org.au/sites/default/files/ALIA-Future-of-the-LIS-Profession-05-Schools-Summary.pdf

quarta-feira, 18 de Junho de 2014

sábado, 14 de Junho de 2014

How Open Is It? Espetro do Acesso Aberto em Português : Projetos Open Access da Universidade do Minho

Os Serviços de Documentação da Universidade do Minho em colaboração com a PLOS levaram a cabo a tradução para português do guia HowOpenIsIt? Espetro do Acesso Aberto. Este guia pretende ser um suporte de apoio para compreender os componentes que definem as revistas científicas em Acesso Aberto, reconhecer o que faz uma revista científica ser mais ou menos aberta e tomar decisões informadas sobre onde publicar.



How Open Is It? Espetro do Acesso Aberto em Português : Projetos Open Access da Universidade do Minho

segunda-feira, 9 de Junho de 2014

Why Aren’t More Schools Using Free, Open Resources? | MindShift



WHY DON’T MORE DISTRICTS GO OPEN?
There could be a lot of reasons more districts aren’t following the Penn Manor path. In many cases districts haven’t even heard of the open-source options available. In others, there’s a perception that getting something for free inherently means it will be a worse product.
In other places, giving students the most expensive, shiniest device might be a point of pride. “We wanted our students to have the best of the best,” said Dr. Darryl Adams, Superintendent ofCoachella Valley Unified School District. This is a very poor district. Every child gets free and reduced priced lunch and yet voters passed a $42 million bond in 2012 to provide technology to schools. In the eyes of this district’s students, Apple products are the best.
“They’re very proud,” Adams said. “There are two other districts in the valley that are more affluent, but they don’t have what our kids have.” The district also chose iPads because it liked Apple’s iLife products and wanted teachers to have access to the app store with its many education resources. “We felt like the benefits outweighed the cost,” Adams said. “We wanted something more systematic.”
Hillview Middle School in the much more affluent Menlo Park School District had similar reasons for choosing iPads. “Currently, and things are changing, the iPad education app store is far more advanced, mature, bugless and ubiquitous than the others,” said Eric Burmeister, principal of Hillview Middle School. At his school all app downloads have to be approved and initiated by the IT department, so all the devices have the same resources on them. The central system knows immediately if a student has tampered with any of the internet filter settings or tried to download something.
Burmeister said he chose tablets instead of laptops because he felt the touch screen was intuitive to students and the devices could do just as much as laptops in terms of video editing and other creation tools.
Yet another district, Oakland Unified, chose Chromebooks, deciding that the most important resource for students is the internet and the many programs and applications found there. Relying on the internet allows schools to make individual decisions about when and where to spend money on other online tools.
“Don’t pay for anything until you’ve gone to one end of the internet and back and decided that it either doesn’t exist for free or it doesn’t exist in the way you really need it to in terms of functionality and support,” said Killian Betlach, principal of Elmhurst Community Prep, a Title I school. “There is so much out there.” He’s confident with a strong internet connection his teachers can do a lot to support their student’s learning.
Reisinger understands concerns of other districts, but can’t help thinking they are overlooking powerful, low cost tools in the open community. “There’s so much emphasis on the new and shiny,” he said. “And in some ways we’re going back to the start, letting kids work on computing and programming, it’s not that sexy.” For him, the big differentiators is the freedom to explore and build meaningful products without being cut off from the underlying code.
If this program is truly for and about our kids then why would we not want to put them in the drivers seat and make them the engineers?” Reisinger said.

Why Aren’t More Schools Using Free, Open Resources? | MindShift



WHY DON’T MORE DISTRICTS GO OPEN?
There could be a lot of reasons more districts aren’t following the Penn Manor path. In many cases districts haven’t even heard of the open-source options available. In others, there’s a perception that getting something for free inherently means it will be a worse product.
In other places, giving students the most expensive, shiniest device might be a point of pride. “We wanted our students to have the best of the best,” said Dr. Darryl Adams, Superintendent ofCoachella Valley Unified School District. This is a very poor district. Every child gets free and reduced priced lunch and yet voters passed a $42 million bond in 2012 to provide technology to schools. In the eyes of this district’s students, Apple products are the best.
“They’re very proud,” Adams said. “There are two other districts in the valley that are more affluent, but they don’t have what our kids have.” The district also chose iPads because it liked Apple’s iLife products and wanted teachers to have access to the app store with its many education resources. “We felt like the benefits outweighed the cost,” Adams said. “We wanted something more systematic.”
Hillview Middle School in the much more affluent Menlo Park School District had similar reasons for choosing iPads. “Currently, and things are changing, the iPad education app store is far more advanced, mature, bugless and ubiquitous than the others,” said Eric Burmeister, principal of Hillview Middle School. At his school all app downloads have to be approved and initiated by the IT department, so all the devices have the same resources on them. The central system knows immediately if a student has tampered with any of the internet filter settings or tried to download something.
Burmeister said he chose tablets instead of laptops because he felt the touch screen was intuitive to students and the devices could do just as much as laptops in terms of video editing and other creation tools.
Yet another district, Oakland Unified, chose Chromebooks, deciding that the most important resource for students is the internet and the many programs and applications found there. Relying on the internet allows schools to make individual decisions about when and where to spend money on other online tools.
“Don’t pay for anything until you’ve gone to one end of the internet and back and decided that it either doesn’t exist for free or it doesn’t exist in the way you really need it to in terms of functionality and support,” said Killian Betlach, principal of Elmhurst Community Prep, a Title I school. “There is so much out there.” He’s confident with a strong internet connection his teachers can do a lot to support their student’s learning.
Reisinger understands concerns of other districts, but can’t help thinking they are overlooking powerful, low cost tools in the open community. “There’s so much emphasis on the new and shiny,” he said. “And in some ways we’re going back to the start, letting kids work on computing and programming, it’s not that sexy.” For him, the big differentiators is the freedom to explore and build meaningful products without being cut off from the underlying code.
If this program is truly for and about our kids then why would we not want to put them in the drivers seat and make them the engineers?” Reisinger said.