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quinta-feira, 12 de dezembro de 2013

25 ideias para promover a leitura diariamente nas escolas



1. Set aside time for independent reading. Time for reading independently doesn’t just happen. Plan for it by making it a priority in schedules across K-12 classrooms. You may need to get creative by stealing minutes here and there, but find at least 15 minutes a day (20 recommended) for self-selecting, independent reading.

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terça-feira, 10 de dezembro de 2013

Information Literacy Weblog: UNESCO General Conference endorses Media and Information Literacy resolution: an international step forward!


"As Recomendações da IFLA sobre Literacia da Informação e dos Media podem oferecer fundamentação vital para assegurar que todos os cidadãos tenham competências e capacidades para participar de modo equitativo nas Sociedades do Conhecimento desenvolvendo ações para colaborações de múltiplo apoio entre governos, e organizações do setor privado e do setor público, bibliotecários, educadores e outros promotores, em países desenvolvidos e em vias de desenvolvimento." 
(tradução livre do documento original, em inglês, aprovado em 05.11.2013 - Resolução proposta pelas Filipinas, com o apoio da Croácia, Finlândia, Alemanha, Oman, Polónia e Federação Russa)
Information Literacy Weblog: UNESCO General Conference endorses Media and Information Literacy resolution: an international step forward!

Tecnologias emergentes e o muito que se aprende a brincar

Social Media: Libraries Are Posting, but Is Anyone Listening?



Education innovation: A case study in what not to do


"There is no body of evidence that iPads will increase math and reading scores on state standardized tests. There is no evidence that students using iPads (or laptops or desktop computers) will get decent paying jobs after graduation.
These are the most common reasons boards of education and school administrators across the nation give for buying tablets for K-12 students. But not in LAUSD.
Acquiring 1:1 iPads for students, according to the LAUSD press release is to: “provide an individualized, interactive and informative-rich learning environment” for every student. One would have to assume that such an “environment” would lead to gains in test scores. But it is an assumption. Since many low-income families do not have computers at home or Internet connections, providing iPads is a worthy reason — what used to be called “closing the digital divide“ — for the large expenditure.
On what basis, however, will the district determine whether to move to Phase 2 of the plan? Again, according to the official press release, the assessment of this first phase “will include feedback … from teachers, students, parents and other key stakeholders.” That’s it. No hard data on how often the devices were used, in what situations, and under what conditions. Nor mention of data on student outcomes.
Now, informal surveys of teachers and school administrators show mixed reactions, even disaffection for iPads in classrooms."
Education innovation: A case study in what not to do